Bringing in the Tech Transport Out?

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Story variant A:

A nationally know private company finds Rhode Island to be an up-and-comer with a lot of opportunity in the technology field and invests in an office and employees in the state.

Story variant B (reality):

A small, still-brand-new non-profit (i.e., tax exempt, to some extent) organization that has somehow gotten a call-out from the President of the United States receives $350,000 from the Rhode Island Dept. of Labor and Training (i.e., taxpayer money) to set up a location in the state.

What are the odds that LaunchCode‘s dominant model in Rhode Island will be to place students whose education was paid for and/or subsidized by Rhode Island taxpayers with companies that actually have technology jobs in other states? ¬†Even if that were its entire reason for coming to Rhode Island, it would be wrong to ban such a company, but forcing Rhode Islanders to lure the company here seems to be a questionable economic development decision.



  • Rhett Hardwick

    The answer is to “greenhouse” some technology here. You would think Brown has enough “science” going on to spin off something. Could it be we are too close to “128”? We may have the tech grads, but do we have the worker bees?

    • Mike678

      Actually, it isn’t an ‘answer’ if it isn’t feasible or a strategy to execute isn’t also provided–as well as a examination of the risks. Your ‘greenhouse’ response is a possibility…how would you execute it and what are the risks?

      • Rhett Hardwick

        “.how would you execute it ”

        I suppose I would start by looking into how Cambridge has done it. Then I would make it known to Brown science/medical faculty that we would be interested in assisting. I am not sure where the “assist” would go,. the idea comes first. It may just be that MIT has stumbled upon a perfect situation and ran with the ball. I have in mind a relative who made a fortune in RI with “start ups” in the 70’s. He had industrial property on his hands and a lack of tenants. He gave start ups a years free rent in exchange for 10% of the stock. Some took off. Perhaps we could popularize the idea.

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