Ease on Easter

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Easter vigil and eggs hidden for four children kept me up later than I’m accustomed, and (I suspect) a little too much sampling of the candy made me restless in the night.  I suppose it’s theologically appropriate to have this mixture of exhaustion and excitement on Easter Day.

Also appropriate, perhaps, is the reminder that one must relax from time to time.  I’ve found I can no longer do it.  Movie watching I do while folding laundry or some other stationary task.  Exercise comes also with reading (on the exercise bike) or podcast listening (on the machine).  Some tasks can only be done on their own, such as book reading and piano playing, but these I’ve put on the itinerary as productive tasks.

It occurred to me, while pouring my first post-Lent beer before undertaking the late-night tasks, that I once could sit and listen to night sounds for unplanned spells.  Or maybe I’d contribute to the suite with a guitar in hand, but idly, not as practice or on a schedule, simply strumming for as long as I felt like it.  Once, at my parents’ apartment, a raccoon poked his head up on the deck to see what I was playing.

It’s a short life, perhaps, but a long wait for the Savior’s return, and relearning how to be at ease can only be healthy.  Seems to me there’s a Commandment involved in it, too.  Perhaps I’ll make it a resolution for the Easter season and beyond.

Simply sitting and being is difficult, though.  Thoughts intrude… challenges to resolve at work, a family to order and raise well, a house to maintain, a community to guide toward a more harmonious and fairer future, and a parade of the “least of these” through whom to serve the Lord.  All these demands must be ordered and prioritized and scheduled and planned.  How can one simply sit?

I’ll give it a try, today.  I see I’ve got an opening from 4:00 to 4:25.



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