Government’s Unsurprising Preferred Demographic

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Apparently for the first time, Bryant’s Hassenfeld Institute released detailed crosstabs from its most recent public-opinion survey.  It’s interesting stuff.

Readers may have seen reports that Governor Gina Raimondo’s toll proposal is under water, with more people opposing it than supporting it.  Republicans’ pay-as-you-go alternative is also under water, by even more, but the question may have caused that result with the phrase, “may take longer to repair the roads and bridges.”  Given a list of four alternatives for funding infrastructure repairs, voters overwhelmingly support “reallocating state money to pay for the repairs,” 37.2% versus a toll-and-borrow plan’s 21.9%.  In fact, people are even less supportive of pay-as-you-go with a truck toll (12.5%).

Particularly interesting, though, is the right-direction/wrong-direction question.  Rhode Islanders are notably less optimistic than they were in September, although still a little more optimistic than last April.  According to the newly available information in the latest poll, a large part of the “right direction” results come from people under 40 with household income under $25,000.

Tracing those groups through the other questions — especially measured by income — shows they tend to fall on what might be called the pro-government side.  They are the least likely, for example, to support reallocating other money to infrastructure.  They are the least likely to say “locally elected officials” are doing a “fair/poor” job (although more than half still say it).  They give elected state officials the best marks.

When it comes to education reform, those with incomes under $25,000, they are the most likely to say principals need more authority, yet the least likely to say that the system has to “make it easier to deal with under performing teachers.  (Perhaps they don’t see principals as the managerial employees who would handle underperforming teachers, but more like head teachers, themselves.)  They are also among the least likely to support expanded school choice.

Not surprisingly, those with incomes under $25,000 are also the most likely to say that they are Democrats, as the only income group among which more than half of respondents say they are a member of a particular party.

That sheds some light, I’d say, on the state government’s preference for policies to make ours a “company state,” in which the government imports clients for itself, largely from other countries.  It also seems relevant to an approach to economic development that places a premium on, as the Brookings Institution report put it, “coveted Millennials.”

The young and the least wealthy also made up the smallest groups in the Hassenfeld Institute’s survey.  Many of the policies that our state government pursues can be explained if we assume that government officials want to change that.



  • Raymond Carter

    Let’s see the newsmedia have the balls to pose this question:
    “Do you favor a CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT forever banning tolls on cars”.
    Love to see St. Gina’s and the Smith Hill maggots reaction to the results of THAT poll…
    LOL
    Tommy Cranston

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