Looking for the Secret of Democrat Mayors’ Mystique

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The polling group, Morning Consult, has released its first-quarter 2019 results for the approval and disapproval rates of governors across the United States.  Glancing at the feature at the top, showing the 10 most popular governors, an obvious fact might jump out at those who pay attention to politics:  They’re all Republicans.

In fact, of the 22 governors with at least 50% approval, only four are Democrats.  That means 19 Democrat governors are leading states in which fewer than half of people are willing to say they approve of  them.  That contrasts with just nine Republicans of whom the same could be said.

Rhode Island’s Democrat offering on the list, Gina Raimondo, ties with two other Democrats for third-lowest approval rating.  The tie goes away, however, when one notes that Raimondo’s disapproval rate of 50%.  Only Republican Matt Bevin, of Kentucky, outdoes that, with 52% disapproval.

That means Rhode Islanders have more reason than most to solve a mystery inherent in the numbers:  How are Democrats able to secure and hold governorships despite their unpopularity while governing?



  • ShannonEntropy

    Polls are wrong all the time. “Dewey Defeats Truman!”
    … Hillary is the 99.5% sure-fire winner… Brexit will go down in flames

    The reason they get it wrong is cuz pollsters just sample random people. But the only ones who matter are the people who actually vote. And lots of people who vote — like Mrs Entropy & I — routinely refuse to even answer polls. Polls also include lots of young people — Hillary voters & No-Brexiteers fer shur — who donut actually get off their keisters and go vote

    Politicians do what’s called “Internal Polling”… private polls that only contact registered voters who actually voted in recent past elections in whatever State or even district is in question. Why do you think ‘Patches” Patrick Kennedy suddenly decided to drop out ?? I fergit what his public explanation was, but the real reason was that the public polls showed him way ahead, but his internal poll had him losing

    So the fact that Gina is unpopular among the masses but got a majority of the votes duzn’t surprise me in the least

    A book on my list I haven’t gotten to yet but have read a lengthy excerpt from explains this all in much greater detail:

    https://www.simonandschuster.com/books/Where-Did-You-Get-This-Number/Anthony-Salvanto/9781501174834

  • D. S. Crockett

    Our state mirrors other states where public sector unions and generous social service benefits dominate (42% of the state budget). Can’t say for the other failing states, but the largest employer of our state is the government. People vote their self-interest, so they stick with the D-brand where support for the status quo is guaranteed. We’re fxxxxx!

    • Rhett Hardwick

      Much as I would approve, I think it I unrealistic to hope for a Damascene moment which will turn it all around. For instance, was Patches Kennedy replaced by a polar opposite? RI has years of hard work ahead and I fear the people capable of it are finding greener pastures.

      As to government employees, the national average by state is about 22%. I think that is just about where RI is. I have always wondered about 1 in 5 to govern us.

      • D. S. Crockett

        Rhett: Much appreciate your comments and enjoy reading them. If you became Dictator of Rhode Island, what would be your prescription for turning around the ship?

        • Rhett Hardwick

          Almost every area has a “peculiar economic advantage”, we have to find ours. Development of a “port” is always shouted down to “save the bay”, but has done a lot for Charleston, SC. We have the bay and tourism, but that doesn’t produce high pay. Back in the 80’s, I knew a project manager for a Canadian real estate developer (then the largest in the world, but now defunct) They had their eye on Providence because of it’s geographic location, combined with Reagan “deregulation”. That is interesting, but I wonder if the Internet has not destroyed the advantage. As I watch property values in neighboring Massachusetts, I wonder if we should become a bedroom town for Boston. Economically, that would leave us “shining each other’s shoes”. Without “industry” here, educating our kids simply inclines them to leave.
          What we do have is health care and education. Perhaps we should attempt to enlarge that. But, for instance, how many people does Brown employ. I think we have to lose our “manufacturing heritage” which provided jobs for the marginally employable immigrant. AI is eating that which is not “offshored”.
          Lastly, we are tiny. Let us give up “big dreams”. There isn’t room for a Boeing plant. We should concentrate on being “user friendly” so perhaps we could draw businesses from Massachusetts, or portions of them. That was the idea behind “deregulation”. It might create a specialized “cluster” in RI. Once again, the effect of the internet. 30% of our “overnight” radiology is done in India.
          Somehow RI’ers have to think of themselves as “citizens of the world” instead of dedicating themselves to getting their kids “on the city”.
          Sorry, no panacea here.

    • ShannonEntropy

      You didn’t ask me, but if I were Dictator, the first things I would do would be to appoint Justin Katz as my successor; and then abdicate. My reasons are two-fold:

      1.) If the policy prescriptions of Justin, Mike, Monique & the OSC4F&P were put into place and enforced, this State would turn around so fast we’d all prolly get whiplash. And…

      2.) Governing is work; and in my book, “work” is a four-letter word

      • D. S. Crockett

        Touche, Shannon. You and Rhett make my frequent visits to this site worthwhile. Nice to see that the cast of characters now commenting on this site growing. Let’s hope Justin will spark the revolution our beloved state needs. Fight on! Remember the Alamo!

        • Rhett Hardwick

          I was just reflecting on the number of public employees. I realized that Providence’s population has declined about 50% since 1950. Does anyone have a handle on the number, and character, of Providence employees in that time period? One would normally expect a decline.

      • Justin Katz

        Gee, thanks for leaving me with the work! (Let’s see if I survive a potential recall in Tiverton, first, although I guess if it’s a succession of dictators, recalls won’t be much of an issue.)

        • ShannonEntropy

          Remind me to tell you about the time Bob Healey offered me the Cool Moose Party’s nomination for US Senator

          I respectfully turned him down mainly cuz I was still working then, and a job as US Senator would have meant a significant pay cut. Not to mention the extra expenses of having to have a second residence in DC

          p.s. Are you serious ?? There is actually a recall move agin you ??

          • Rhett Hardwick

            While I suppose I approve of recall elections; in a small town, wouldn’t that be a special election. A relatively great expense, I would think. Plus, it would only attract diehards.

          • Justin Katz

            Yes. That hasn’t been enough to hold back the tide of hate. Most of the people involved don’t seem to care much about spending the people’s money, anyway. And in any event the guy leading the charge has a $4 million lawsuit against the town (resulting from actions of the people who will return to power if we’re recalled, if you can believe it), and he’s promised to reimburse the town if it succeeds.

          • Justin Katz

            Yes. They’re out there gathering signatures now. The more rational people among our opposition were hesitant to take that step, but when one eccentric guy took out the papers, they joined in for the effort.

          • Rhett Hardwick

            For reason that “for every wrong there is a remedy” I can approve of recall elections. But part disturbs me. The situation boils down to the principle that people elected in “large numbers” at a general election can be recalled by a “small number” of diehards at a special election.

          • ShannonEntropy

            If yer recalled, pull a “Jasiel Correia” and run again the next election

            https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/13/us/jasiel-correia-mayor-fall-river.html

  • ShannonEntropy

    Speaking of voters refusing to answer polls, here’s yesterday’s Blondie comic strip. Dagwood first appeared in the papers in 1930, making him a senior citizen: the age group most likely to vote

    https://safr.kingfeatures.com/api/img.php?e=gif&s=c&file=QmxvbmRpZS8yMDE5LzA0L0Jsb25kaWUuMjAxOTA0MzBfMTUzNi5naWY=

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