Meeting the Challenge of Education Reform

Raimondo-and-Projo-featured

The Providence Journal editorial board is (let’s just say) very forceful on the subject of Rhode Island students’ test results:

The weak and timid reforms he and Gov. Gina Raimondo have advanced, while soothing to special interests, have been plainly insufficient. It is time for a shakeup at the Rhode Island Department of Education and the state Board of Education. Will anyone have the decency to resign for having failed our young people?

Robert Walsh of the National Education Association and Francis Flynn of the American Federation of Teachers have, similarly, served Rhode Island students abysmally. Union leaders in civic-minded Massachusetts understand that an education system is about more than providing salaries and benefits for adults. We know there are many teachers who yearn for a sound, long-term plan to improve standards.

It is a shame Rhode Island cannot simply shutter its Department of Education and hire Massachusetts to run the Ocean State’s public schools as a subset of its own. It at least knows how to do the job.

I saw editorial page editor Ed Achorn pushing back on Facebook against those who respond to these sentiments by pointing out that the Providence Journal endorsed Democrat Governor Gina Raimondo.  Part of the editor’s response was that the paper has also implored her to improve her record on education, which I’m not sure quite meets the challenge.

Please consider a voluntary, tax-deductible subscription to keep the Current growing and free.

Some of the entities that should be a check on government, like the state’s major newspaper, have this problem:  They formulate their solutions as if we had a properly functioning state.  Under such circumstances, a governor who had received the endorsement might change out of concern that she would lose it.  In Rhode Island, she knows that she has nothing to fear.

Nobody who has secured a role of significance wants to throw down a gauntlet to make any bold changes to the way decisions are made in the state.

It isn’t sufficient to suggest, in passing, that somebody should resign over abysmal test scores.  That outcome has to be important enough that advocates will ensure that insiders cannot achieve their other goals unless they address education.

That, incidentally, is win-win, because the insiders’ other goals are, on the whole, corrupt and oughtn’t be achieved, anyway.  They need to be made to understand, however, that their only hope of keeping any of their ill-gotten gains is by making improvements in this area.



  • breaker94

    Wagner should resign and take common core with him

  • true to my Constitution

    It is a bad combination of teachers salaries and benefits being used to reinforce the Democratic party structure and Democratic party ideology that ensures that students and parents are willful and ignorant. There is no hope of anything getting better.

Quantcast