The Fruits of Halting Education Reform

justin-katz-avatar-smiling

Through the RI Center for Freedom & Prosperity, I put out a one-page report today, time to coincide with National School Choice Week.  Using data available through the Center’s interactive application to review state-level results on the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) tests, the one-pager points out something that I’ve noted before:  Rhode Island actually gained ground through much of the last decade, particularly among disadvantaged students, but hit a hard ceiling when reforms were halted.  Here’s one of the charts from the report with an added political dimension that’s quite striking:

RI-NAEP-averagescores-bygroup-wgovernors-2003-2015

As the General Assembly promises to knock around charter schools this session (with some reforms that I actually break from school choice allies in supporting), Rhode Islanders should rouse themselves at least a little bit to insist that the special interests who control our state — in particular, public education — must be made to step aside in the interest of real, secure, long-term school choice that stops funding government-branded schools and starts funding education.  In other words, we need real school choice in the Ocean State.



Quantcast