Content Types

Analysis

South Kingstown School Bond: Inter Alia, a Really High Price to Reduce Classroom Space by 200,000 Sq Ft

On May 4, residents of South Kingstown will be voting on an $85,000,000 school bond referendum.

That’s a pretty high amount for town residents to go on the hook for, mainly because the town’s student enrollment has been steadily declining but also because the cornerstone component of the proposed works, the high school, would not be newbuild but conversion of an existing school building. Two miles AWAY, by the way, from its current in-town location.

As there would be state funds involved, the project itself, its costs and its proposed funding sources have to be approved by the Rhode Island Department of Education. (Link here to the town’s facility application submitted to RIDE).

So the Ocean State Current reached out to RIDE with the questions below and received the indicated answers.


No Cost Projections or Means Identified to Achieve Rhode Island’s Green New Deal

The innocently named “2021 Act on Climate”, H5445, has been ominously rocketing through the General Assembly. It passed the full House on March 23 and the full Senate is scheduled to vote on it this afternoon. If it passes, it will have cleared the General Assembly and presumably be sent straight on to Governor Daniel McKee for his action within seven (ten?) days.

Informally dubbed “Rhode Island’s Green New Deal”, H5445 would mandate the reduction to zero by 2050 of greenhouse gases in Rhode Island – a goal that could only be accomplished by eliminating the use of all fossil fuels and transitioning entirely to renewable energy sources, wind and solar; i.e., from reliable, reasonably priced energy sources to intermittent, exorbitantly expensive ones. More about it here, including why the effective date of substantial implementation would be 2026, not thirty long years from now.

But perhaps we are missing something. Have proponents of the bill answered the critically important question about cost of implementation?


One Year In: Lockdowns 100% Destruction; Zero Benefit

On its one year anniversary, it would be irresponsible not to look at the effectiveness of the COVID-19 lockdown. Florida and California vividly demonstrate that the answer is “completely ineffective”: the two states have had similar outcomes to very different approaches, making it clear that lockdowns did not and do not work to slow or stop the spread of COVID-19.

What about Rhode Island? Well, we locked down. And we have the third highest COVID-19 deaths nationally.

Lockdowns, even if they worked exactly as hoped, were never a good solution because of the enormous public health and other consequences they inflict. One year later, it is clear, as they do not achieve even their hoped-for goal, that they are entirely destructive with zero public health benefit.

Now, let’s look at where Rhode Island stands on the original reason for a lockdown: two weeks to flatten the curve and not overwhelm hospitals. Below is the trend of Rhode Island’s hospitalizations; specifically, Column U, “Currently Hospitalized” of this sheet:

4/28/2020: 375 (Spring, 2020 peak)

12/15/2020: 516

1/25/2021: 380

3/9/2021: 141

By this original goalpost, Rhode Island can open up fully, now. (Please stop with the agonizing and ineffective baby steps.) More to the point, the state never needs to lock down again for this (or any) reason. This is because, to her credit, former Governor Gina Raimondo set up COVID-19 field hospitals. While they were recently shut down because COVID-19 cases have dropped markedly, they will remain in place in the event of a surge.

The evidence and observed science one year into COVID-19 lockdowns is blaring and indisputable: they do not work. All states can and should open up immediately, fully, without restrictions – including nursing homes with reasonable protections. Refusing to do so is to deny the plain evidence and prolong the needless suffering and very serious health and other consequences of lockdowns.


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Research

TCI Gas Tax: Hurting Families While Accomplishing Little

One doesn’t have to be a climate-change skeptic to wonder why our elected officials would pursue an agreement that hands over some of their authority in order to impose a significant burden on the people they represent for a small benefit to others… all just as Rhode Islanders struggle to regain their feet from the COVID lockdown that the same governor imposed through executive order.


Aging Population No Excuse for RI

Putting aside whether we should care about the size of our labor force, it isn’t true that Rhode Island’s has been disproportionately affected by the aging population.


April 2020 Employment: COVID Flips the Table

Employment and labor force are among the first hard data we have of the effects of our state and nation’s response to COVID-19, and they aren’t pretty.


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Opinion

#InTheDugout: Dr. Cretella & Dr. Bostom

Topics:
 
– The insanity of the push for high school and other public vaccination clinics!
– Is there such a thing a vaccine “shedding”?
– Stenhouse statement on TCI.

In The Dugout: Fathers Should Take their Families to Mass and the ABC’s of Cryptocurrency

-Will the Cancel Culture Cancel Caitlyn?
-CATHOLIC ALERT: Tyler Rowley on why fathers should take their families to Mass
-Update on the SK school bond
-Special guest expert: the ABC’s of cryptocurrency and block-chain technology

#InTheDugout: SIX BIG QUESTIONS on HS vaccination clinics


Also:

  • More Woke Left Madness
  • What is going on in South Kingstown? Unions mailing their propaganda to kids?

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Investigative Report

Apparent Unemployment Insurance Letters Sent to Mississippi

Apparent unemployment insurance correspondence from the Rhode Island Department of Labor and Training (DLT) sent to an address in Mississippi joins the list of examples of problems handling the government program.


DOH “Whistle-Blower” Summoned to Ominous HR Meeting

An RI Department of Health employee fears retaliation as she’s ordered to attend a meeting with multiple state officials after going public with concerns about nursing home oversight during the COVID-19 pandemic.


David de la Cruz: East Providence PD Shut Down Religious Service in March

Days after an executive order from the governor forbade gatherings, the East Providence police shut down a church despite voluntary plans to limit risks.


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Liveblog

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Longer Twitter

A Novel Purpose for Campaign Funds

Regulating candidacies shrinks the pool of candidates and ensures that the successful politician will often be the one with the greatest talent for corruption.


Shot in the Arm or Permanent IV?

Does anybody else see headlines like the following, from WPRI, and think it sounds kind of like our state is on life support?


The Working Day of RI’s Aristocracy

The most direct evidence that something is very, very wrong in RI government is that a mayor can be so out of touch that he’d think working a standard workday justifies double pay.


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Interviews & Profiles

In The Dugout: DOH Whistleblower On Media Lockout

Mike Stenhouse brings Lisa Camuso back on the show to talk about how pervasively the Rhode Island media is ignoring her story of problems at the state Department of Health.


In The Dugout: Allen Waters on School Choice

US Senate Candidate Allen Waters joins CEO Stenhouse on this episode of “In The Dugout.” They discuss his support for the Center’s Catch-UP ESA program. This innovative policy idea would tap unspent federal funds to empower parents to customize supplemental programs for their children. These one-time Catch-Up ESAs, available to all qualified students in the state, would also immediately fill major gaps in the five-year Providence schools reform plan, by addressing current student needs. The program would be funded by unspent federal CARES Act funds.


In the Dugout: Ray Rickman on Race in Rhode Island


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