Opioid Solutions When the Government Refuses to Address Problems

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In his recent essay on this site, Dr. Stephen Skoly described the consequences of legislation seeking to regulate prescription opioids, but he stopped short of broad conclusions about the politics involved.  As it happens, one such conclusion fit in well with the other topics that John DePetro and I discussed on December 30.

We can, of course, debate whether a new $5 million fee for opioid manufacturers and wholesalers is actually about solving a social problem, rather than finding a new source of revenue.  But taking the politicians at their word for their motivation, one can at least say that such policies infantilize the people, as if our legislators and governor are the only adults in the state and therefore must protect patients from their irresponsible selves and from greedy doctors.

Something milder and, in its way, worse is probably going on, as well.  The theme that John and I happened upon in our segment was that government officials in Rhode Island shy away from addressing actual problems.  They look for all sorts of ways to get at them without actually naming and attacking the root causes.

When it comes to a failing education system, they seek work-arounds and small tweaks like, like shifting authority toward principals, rather than draw attention to the labor-union structure that makes the system all about the remuneration of adults rather than the education of children.  When it comes to teenage fights at a mall, the focus goes to things like community programs to give kids something to do, rather than unraveling the progressive assumptions that lead to gang-friendly policing and suspension-unfriendly school regulations (not to mention identity-group entitlement).

Just so, going after fentanyl and heroin on the criminal market would manifest in urban areas and among minorities.  Many people in those communities would be grateful for the improved environment, but the enforcement and incarceration statistics would look bad and draw the attention of groups like the ACLU.  So instead, government tries to find a solution from the other side, making things more difficult (literally more painful) for law-abiding citizens, in the hopes that they can limit the market for the drugs and make the dealers go away for lack of profit.

If that approach also produces a $5 million fee for government, so much the better.



  • Rhett Hardwick

    First let us accept that drug money is the cause of much minor crime. Massachusetts has recently legalized marijuana. My sources in the netherworld indicate that the “street price” of marijuana is $200 an ounce. The price in the “legalized” stores is $400 an ounce. Isn’t this likely to lead to more minor crime?

  • Tomlin

    Everyone involved in the pain medication genocide needs to be arrested and imprisoned for life!!!!! I have spent 4 miserable years without treatment due to a chicken shit RI so-called Doctor who was afraid of the RI Medical board and took my pain meds away because I would not go along with the board’s regime of replacing pain meds with suboxone ($$$$ for them) They are all criminals and should all be charged with attempted man slaughter at the very least. I know people across the country who have died from having pain medications stripped away from them…YES PAIN KILLS! …and they don’t give a shit! I would love to know what these asshats do when they or their loved ones suffer chronic pain. Tell it to my twisted agonizing spine!!!!! I can never understand or forgive these commies for what they’ve done to Americans in pain.

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