The “Let Me Outta Here” State

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Things are getting so hopeless in Venezuela that young go-getters trained for high-prestige jobs are going… to get low-level jobs in nearby countries:

After six years of studying and working part-time jobs, Cristian Diaga, 24, will soon graduate from medical school in Caracas, Venezuela. But instead of continuing his training in a top hospital in the country, as he had hoped, he is taking a job in a fast-food restaurant in Argentina – a situation he says is much more preferable. …

More than half of Venezuelans between 15 and 29 want to move abroad permanently, according to a poll carried out by the US firm Gallup and shared exclusively with the Guardian.

“In Venezuela, it feels like we are all just dying slowly and there’s no hope for a change. I don’t care if I’m gonna work as a doctor or not. I just want to have food, medicines, security, a house, a car, and be able to give a good life to my loved ones,” he says.

Regarding the population as a whole, a 2017 Gallup poll found that 41% of Venezuelans would like to move away permanently.

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As it happens, 41% is also the result Gallup found in 2016 for the percentage of Rhode Islanders who would like to leave the state.  That was a slight improvement from the result from the same poll in 2014, although the Ocean State fell from 5th worst to 4th worst.

As I noted regarding the earlier finding, the comparison isn’t really fair.  After all, states with more opportunity are close and easy to move to and, therefore, probably more tantalizing.  Moreover, I’d wager that more than 41% of Venezuelans would jump at the chance to move to Rhode Island.

But still.  Only 22% of New Hampshire residents want out (8th best).



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