RhodeMap and the Sustainable Elimination of Freedom

justin-katz-avatar-smiling

With the House Finance Committee scheduled to hold a hearing on several bills related to state planning and RhodeMap RI, this afternoon at the rise of the House, this article with similar themes in the Midwest caught my eye:

Here in the Twin Cities, a handful of unelected bureaucrats are gearing up to impose their vision of the ideal society on the nearly three million residents of the Minneapolis-St. Paul metro region. According to the urban planners on the city’s Metropolitan Council, far too many people live in single family homes, have neighbors with similar incomes and skin color, and contribute to climate change by driving to work. They intend to change all that with a 30-year master plan called “Thrive MSP 2040.” . . .

Thrive MSP 2040 is part of a nationwide movement called “regionalism.” Regional planning of infrastructure is important, of course. But regionalism, as an ideology, is about shifting power away from local elected officials and re-engineering society on behalf of “equity” and “sustainability.” According to regionalist guru David Rusk, author of the book “Cities Without Suburbs,” federal programs that promote regionalism should strive to produce “racially and economically integrated and environmentally sustainable regions.”

This is a well-planned assault on American freedoms concocted by a global elite and in the ivory towers of the U.S. that has been facilitated and substantially funded — in planning and implementation — with taxpayer dollars by the Obama Administration.  Of all the damaging initiatives that have been undertaken in the process of “fundamentally transforming” the United States of America, as Obama pledged to do, this one may be a sleeper that creeps up on Americans, but it may also be the one that locks the chains around our ankles.



  • GaryM

    There was a time when buying a home meant doing your homework to choose a quality neighborhood. At risk was the largest investment most people would make in their lifetime.

    Now, buying in a neighborhood with large lots may actually have a downside – the large lot may be space for a high density high rise next door.

    Think I’m kidding. Check out the story of the 1 acre home and lot at 77 Nearwater Lane in Darien Ct.

    http://www.salon.com/2013/07/20/snob_zones_fear_money_and_real_estate/

    This is what RhodeMap RI is promoting. All in the name of social fairness

Quantcast