Governor’s Back Door TCI Tax Would Cost You At The Pump

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The prices for gasoline could soon rise dramatically for your family if the Raimondo administration undercuts the authority of the General Assembly, and moves forward with its plan to sign-on to a new stealth carbon-tax scheme – the TCI Tax… a move that would necessarily increase costs on families and business at the pump, and that also could lead to Constitutional legal challenges.
Center No TCI Tax
This tax – a green-new-deal type government mandate – is also a regressive fuel tax that will disproportionately harm low-income families, who will struggle much more than the wealthy to pay the higher gasoline prices.

We are already suffering through a great Ocean State Exodus because of the worst business climate in the nation. Imagine instead our Ocean State as a more attractive home and destination of choice for families. The Governor cannot unilaterally force motorists to pay higher gasoline taxes if there is zero resulting environmental benefit?

Click on the link here now to read more on the TCI Gas Tax threat on RIFreedom.org.



  • scottns

    I live 1 mile from the Massachusetts border and 2 miles from the nearest Massachusetts gas station. Do the math RI politicians! You’re just moving gas purchases to MA and CT.

    • bagida’wewinini

      MA & CT have signed the TCI. You may start to question the veracity of those who write for this site

      https://www.c2es.org/content/multi-state

      • bagida’wewinini

        How far do live from Ohio and Virginia?

    • Justin Katz

      Unfortunately, this is a regional collaborative. From what we’re hearing, New Hampshire and Vermont may not join, but Massachusetts appears to be on board, and it looks likely CT will join. Of course, another way to look at it is the boost that our gas stations could see if we were a haven in Southern New England.

      • Joe Smith

        Exactly Justin – imagine if for once our gas was cheaper – you’d not only get the border crossing, but the other stuff people buy since gas is usually a low profit margin item just to get the customer to the store. (hey, cut the cigarette tax a bit and you’d have a double win!).

        Here’s what kills me by Baker. His secretary of energy said – “She said a gas tax is assessed right at the pump and paid directly by the consumer. TCI, by contrast, is assessed on the wholesale fuel distributor who may or may not pass it along to the customer. (https://commonwealthmagazine.org/transportation/tci-looks-a-lot-like-a-gas-tax-but-is-it-2/)

        Argh – anyone with Econ 101 would (should) know that the location of the tax is not the point – it’s the elasticity of demand (and supply) for the product. Consumers yes pay the “tax at the pump” but the net impact on price whether it’s a cost at the pump or at the wholesale will still be based on elasticities.

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